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SERENA'S Finals Failures Analyzed

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SERENA'S Finals Failures Analyzed

Post by Grossefavourite » Aug Mon 19, 2019 1:12 pm

Serena Williams's difficult time compared to Roger Federer's
AUGUST 16, 2019 19:10
by LUIGI GATTO | VIEW 8875

On a column for Tennis Smash, the former world No. 1 Todd Woodbridge commented on Serena Williams's momentum. The American player was forced to withdraw from Cincinnati due to a back injury that she suffered in Toronto. "There is a worrying trend happening for Serena; for the first time in her career she has lost four finals in a row", said Woodbridge.

"What I know from a playing perspective is that when you play your best, you’re instinctive, it’s natural, and you don’t force the play. Serena’s whole career has been built around playing a limited schedule, but if she truly wants to reach this next level and break Margaret Court’s Grand Slam record, she has to do something she has never done before – and that’s to add more matches to her schedule, so she doesn’t break down.

Roger Federer went through this a few years ago – he tried to outplay everybody and beat them in three or four hits. Similarly, Serena seems to have lost patience within rallies, trying to win the matches in the first couple of games by brute force, instead of believing in her other strengths: great defence, keeping the ball in the court, changing up the play, smart tactics. It’s like if that initial plan doesn’t work, she feels like she’s in trouble and panics."

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Re: SERENA'S Finals Failures Analyzed

Post by Grossefavourite » Aug Mon 19, 2019 1:13 pm

I agree 1000%. She's in panic mode.

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Re: SERENA'S Finals Failures Analyzed

Post by Grossefavourite » Aug Mon 19, 2019 3:13 pm

Back ok now?

https://www.businessinsider.com/serena- ... rm=desktop

Serena Williams blasting a quadcopter with a tennis ball provides an important lesson about anti-drone defense

Quadcopters are not built to take a hit.

This is an obvious fact, demonstrated through countless videos on social media, but also one worth keeping in mind as militaries around the world fly small drones as part of regular military routine. Quadcopters are so poorly built for taking hits that, in fact, they can be knocked out of the air with a tennis ball.

Of course, it helps if the tennis ball in question is propelled from the racket of Serena Williams, arguably the greatest tennis star of our age.


In response to an inquiry from XKCD cartoonist Randall Munroe, Serena Williams agreed to try defeating a quadcopter with tennis serves. With her husband Alexis Ohanian piloting a DJI Mavic Pro 2 just above a tennis net, Williams knocked the drone out of the sky on her third attempt. (The process is documented by Munroe in comic form, and in video).

The circumstances and participants are unusual, certainly, but the exercise reveals a fundamental truth about hobbyist, off-the-shelf drones: They are simply not designed for impact.

The average person piloting a quadcopter for some neat footage isn't thinking about how to operate the drone in a battlefield. Nor are drones designed for low flight in tennis courts. When drones do come with obstacle avoidance and detection software, that generally means sensors built to avoid collisions from pilots flying too close to walls, mostly.

But for the military planner and designer who is thinking about ways to counter drones, the threshold for what works is probably a lot lower for hobbyist quadcopters than, say, dedicated jammers, directional antennas, or high-powered lasers. (That there will still be a role for those technologies against dedicated military drones is a given.)

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Re: SERENA'S Finals Failures Analyzed

Post by Grossefavourite » Aug Thu 22, 2019 8:37 am

The last thing Serena needs, is more pressure. This year marks the 20th anniversary of her first USO and GS triumph. I can hardly believe it. I recall exactly where I was, which was just outside of Zurich, Switzerland visiting friends. After she'd won the first set, I told them she'd win the title in straight sets. They thought otherwise. She won of course, which led to the most repugnant comments and depictions of the WS throughout Europe, including the press, that I've ever witnessed. Good thing the idea of social media wasn't a thing then. Anyway, here we are. I just hope Serena puts this and everything else out of her mind and prevail. My gut tells me, no, not this year. It's too much, given what transpired last year as well.

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http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/story/ ... rs-us-open

SERENA’S 20 YEARS AT THE US OPEN


If you want to know when the legend of Serena Williams began, you have to go back to Sept. 11, 1999. The then-17-year-old Williams beat No. 1 Martina Hingis to capture her first Grand Slam singles title in Arthur Ashe Stadium at the US Open.

Over the next 20 years, Williams won another 22 major titles, including five more in New York. She has regaled fans with her game and fashion; she has earned more than $90 million in career prize money. But she also has become an icon, evolving into one of sport's and culture's biggest and most important advocates for racial and gender equality, on and off the court.

Amid all of her success, many of her career highs and lows have come in Flushing Meadows. As she vies for a record-tying 24th Grand Slam title, we recount two decades' worth of memories in the Big Apple.


1999
A STAR IS BORN
At 17, Serena became the fourth-youngest woman in the Open era to win the US Open and the first African American woman to do so since Althea Gibson in 1958.


2001, 2002
SISTER ACT(S)
The Williams sisters met in back-to-back finals, with Venus winning in 2001 (the first Grand Slam final between sisters in 117 years) and Serena taking the 2002 title to claim her third straight major en route to her first Serena Slam.


2002
FASHION FORWARD
Serena's fashion at the US Open has been as trendsetting as her game, perhaps none more so than her Puma catsuit, described by Venus as "really fun, really exciting and very sexy."


2004
IN OR OUT?
Serena lost to Jennifer Capriati in a quarterfinal plagued by several questionable calls. It led US Open officials to apologize and, later, introduce the Hawk-Eye replay system.


2008
SHE’S BAAAACK
Between January 2005 and December 2006, Williams saw her ranking drop to as low as 140th. But she gradually rebounded and capped the monthslong comeback with a 6-4, 7-5 victory against Jelena Jankovic to regain her No. 1 world ranking.


EVERYTHING’S NOT FINE
Serena directed a profanity-laced outburst toward a line judge, who called Williams for a foot fault on a match point for Kim Clijsters in the 2009 semifinals. She received an $82,500 fine, believed to be the largest in a Grand Slam.


2011
COME ON!
Down a set in the final against Samantha Stosur, Serena was assessed a point penalty after yelling "Come on!" before the rally was over. Stosur would go on to win in straight sets. "You're a hater, and you're unattractive inside," Serena told umpire Eva Asderaki.


2014
ELITE COMPANY
Serena won her third straight US Open and 18th Grand Slam title to tie Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova for fourth place on the all-time list.


2015
SEMIFINAL STUNNER
Vying to becoming the first player since Steffi Graf in 1988 to win the calendar Grand Slam, Serena lost to unseeded veteran Roberta Vinci of Italy. After forcing a third set, Vinci rallied from 0-2 to win 2-6, 6-4, 6-4 in one of the most shocking upsets of Williams' career.

2018
SERENA TOPS VENUS IN SIXTH US OPEN MEETING
[Serena] I don’t cheat to win.
2018
SERENA-NAOMI OSAKA FINAL MARRED BY CONTROVERSY AND CODE VIOLATIONS

BETTER WITH AGE?
Most players would consider Williams' early US Open career alone a success. Serena's second half? Well, that has been even better.

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